wewantbalance:

Free books: 100 legal sites to download literature
The Classics
Browse works by Mark Twain, Joseph Conrad and other famous authors here.
Classic Bookshelf: This site has put classic novels online, from Charles Dickens to Charlotte Bronte.
The Online Books Page: The University of Pennsylvania hosts this book search and database.
Project Gutenberg: This famous site has over 27,000 free books online.
Page by Page Books: Find books by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and H.G. Wells, as well as speeches from George W. Bush on this site.
Classic Book Library: Genres here include historical fiction, history, science fiction, mystery, romance and children’s literature, but they’re all classics.
Classic Reader: Here you can read Shakespeare, young adult fiction and more.
Read Print: From George Orwell to Alexandre Dumas to George Eliot to Charles Darwin, this online library is stocked with the best classics.
Planet eBook: Download free classic literature titles here, from Dostoevsky to D.H. Lawrence to Joseph Conrad.
The Spectator Project: Montclair State University’s project features full-text, online versions of The Spectator and The Tatler.
Bibliomania: This site has more than 2,000 classic texts, plus study guides and reference books.
Online Library of Literature: Find full and unabridged texts of classic literature, including the Bronte sisters, Mark Twain and more.
Bartleby: Bartleby has much more than just the classics, but its collection of anthologies and other important novels made it famous.
Fiction.us: Fiction.us has a huge selection of novels, including works by Lewis Carroll, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, Flaubert, George Eliot, F. Scott Fitzgerald and others.
Free Classic Literature: Find British authors like Shakespeare and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, plus other authors like Jules Verne, Mark Twain, and more.
Textbooks
If you don’t absolutely need to pay for your textbooks, save yourself a few hundred dollars by reviewing these sites.
Textbook Revolution: Find biology, business, engineering, mathematics and world history textbooks here.
Wikibooks: From cookbooks to the computing department, find instructional and educational materials here.
KnowThis Free Online Textbooks: Get directed to stats textbooks and more.
Online Medical Textbooks: Find books about plastic surgery, anatomy and more here.
Online Science and Math Textbooks: Access biochemistry, chemistry, aeronautics, medical manuals and other textbooks here.
MIT Open Courseware Supplemental Resources: Find free videos, textbooks and more on the subjects of mechanical engineering, mathematics, chemistry and more.
Flat World Knowledge: This innovative site has created an open college textbooks platform that will launch in January 2009.
Free Business Textbooks: Find free books to go along with accounting, economics and other business classes.
Light and Matter: Here you can access open source physics textbooks.
eMedicine: This project from WebMD is continuously updated and has articles and references on surgery, pediatrics and more.
Math and Science
Turn to this list to find books about math, science, engineering and technology.
FullBooks.com: This site has “thousands of full-text free books,” including a large amount of scientific essays and books.
Free online textbooks, lecture notes, tutorials and videos on mathematics: NYU links to several free resources for math students.
Online Mathematics Texts: Here you can find online textbooks likeElementary Linear Algebra and Complex Variables.
Science and Engineering Books for free download: These books range in topics from nanotechnology to compressible flow.
FreeScience.info: Find over 1800 math, engineering and science books here.
Free Tech Books: Computer programmers and computer science enthusiasts can find helpful books here.
Children’s Books
Even children’s books are now available online. Find illustrated books, chapter books and more.
byGosh: Find free illustrated children’s books and stories here.
Munseys: Munseys has nearly 2,000 children’s titles, plus books about religion, biographies and more.
International Children’s Digital Library: Find award-winning books and search by categories like age group, make believe books, true books or picture books.
Lookybook: Access children’s picture books here.
Philosophy and Religion
For books about philosophy and religion, check out these websites.
Bored.com: Bored.com has music ebooks, cooking ebooks, and over 150 philosophy titles and over 1,000 religion titles.
Ideology.us: Here you’ll find works by Rene Descartes, Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, David Hume and others.
Free Books on Yoga, Religion and Philosophy: Recent uploads to this site include Practical Lessons in Yoga and Philosophy of Dreams.
The Sociology of Religion: Read this book by Max Weber, here.
Religion eBooks: Read books about the Bible, Christian books, and more.
Plays
From Shakespeare to George Bernard Shaw to more contemporary playwrights, visit these sites.
ReadBookOnline.net: Here you can read plays by Chekhov, Thomas Hardy, Ben Jonson, Shakespeare, Edgar Allan Poe and others.
Plays: Read Pygmalion, Uncle Vanya or The Playboy of the Western World here.
The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: MIT has made available all of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, and histories.
Plays Online: This site catalogs “all the plays [they] know about that are available in full text versions online for free.”
ProPlay: This site has children’s plays, comedies, dramas and musicals.
Modern Fiction, Fantasy and Romance
These websites boast collections of graphic novels, romance novels, fantasy books and more.
Public Bookshelf: Find romance novels, mysteries and more.
The Internet Book Database of Fiction: This forum features fantasy and graphic novels, anime, J.K. Rowling and more.
Free Online Novels: Here you can find Christian novels, fantasy and graphic novels, adventure books, horror books and more.
Foxglove: This British site has free novels, satire and short stories.
Baen Free Library: Find books by Scott Gier, Keith Laumer and others.
The Road to Romance: This website has books by Patricia Cornwell and other romance novelists.
Get Free Ebooks: This site’s largest collection includes fiction books.
John T. Cullen: Read short stories from John T. Cullen here.
SF and Fantasy Books Online: Books here include Arabian Nights,Aesop’s Fables and more.
Free Novels Online and Free Online Cyber-Books: This list contains mostly fantasy books.
Foreign Language
For books in a foreign language like French, Spanish and even Romanian, look here.
Project Laurens Jz Coster: Find Dutch literature here.
ATHENA Textes Francais: Search by author’s name, French books, or books written by other authors but translated into French.
Liber Liber: Download Italian books here. Browse by author, title, or subject.
Biblioteca romaneasca: Find Romanian books on this site.
Bibliolteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes: Look up authors to find a catalog of their available works on this Spanish site.
KEIMENA: This page is entirely in Greek, but if you’re looking for modern Greek literature, this is the place to access books online.
Proyecto Cervantes: Texas A&M’s Proyecto Cervantes has cataloged Cervantes’ work online.
Corpus Scriptorum Latinorum: Access many Latin texts here.
Project Runeberg: Find Scandinavian literature online here.
Italian Women Writers: This site provides information about Italian women authors and features full-text titles too.
Biblioteca Valenciana: Register to use this database of Catalan and Valencian books.
Ketab Farsi: Access literature and publications in Farsi from this site.
Afghanistan Digital Library: Powered by NYU, the Afghanistan Digital Library has works published between 1870 and 1930.
CELT: CELT stands for “the Corpus of Electronic Texts” features important historical literature and documents.
Projekt Gutenberg-DE: This easy-to-use database of German language texts lets you search by genres and author.
History and Culture
Refresh your memory of world history, the classics and U.S. history here.
LibriVox: LibriVox has a good selection of historical fiction.
The Perseus Project: Tufts’ Perseus Digital Library features titles from Ancient Rome and Greece, published in English and original languages.
Access Genealogy: Find literature about Native American history, the Scotch-Irish immigration in the 19th and 20th centuries, and more.
Free History Books: This collection features U.S. history books, including works by Paul Jennings, Sarah Morgan Dawson, Josiah Quincy and others.
Most Popular History Books: Free titles include Seven Days and Seven Nights by Alexander Szegedy and Autobiography of a Female Slave by Martha G. Browne.
Rare Books
Look for rare books online here.
Questia: Questia has 5,000 books available for free, including rare books and classics.
JR’s Rare Books and Commentary: Check this site for PDF versions of some rare books.
Arts and Entertainment
This list features books about celebrities, movies, fashion and more.
Books-On-Line: This large collection includes movie scripts, newer works, cookbooks and more.
Chest of Books: This site has a wide range of free books, including gardening and cooking books, home improvement books, craft and hobby books, art books and more.
Free e-Books: Find titles related to beauty and fashion, games, health, drama and more.
2020ok: Categories here include art, graphic design, performing arts, ethnic and national, careers, business and a lot more.
Free Art Books: Find artist books and art books in PDF format here.
Free Web design books: OnlineComputerBooks.com directs you to free web design books.
Free Music Books: Find sheet music, lyrics and books about music here.
Free Fashion Books: Costume and fashion books are linked to the Google Books page.
Mystery
Here you can find mystery books from Sherlock Holmes to more contemporary authors.
MysteryNet: Read free short mystery stories on this site.
TopMystery.com: Read books by Edgar Allan Poe, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, GK Chesterton and other mystery writers here.
Mystery Books: Read books by Sue Grafton and others.
Poetry
These poetry sites have works by Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allan Poe and others.
The Literature Network: This site features forums, a copy of The King James Bible, and over 3,000 short stories and poems.
Poetry: This list includes “The Raven,” “O Captain! My Captain!” and “The Ballad of Bonnie and Clyde.”
Poem Hunter: Find free poems, lyrics and quotations on this site.
Famous Poetry Online: Read limericks, love poetry, and poems by Robert Browning, Emily Dickinson, John Donne, Lord Byron and others.
Google Poetry: Google Books has a large selection of poetry, fromThe Canterbury Tales to Beowulf to Walt Whitman.
QuotesandPoem.com: Read poems by Maya Angelou, William Blake, Sylvia Plath and more.
CompleteClassics.com: Rudyard Kipling, Allen Ginsberg and Alfred Lord Tennyson are all featured here.
PinkPoem.com: On this site, you can download free poetry ebooks.
Miscellaneous
For even more free book sites, check out this list.
Banned Books: Here you can follow links of banned books to their full text online.
World eBook Library: This monstrous collection includes classics, encyclopedias, children’s books and a lot more.
DailyLit: DailyLit has everything from Moby Dick to the more recent phenomenon, Skinny Bitch.
A Celebration of Women Writers: The University of Pennsylvania’s page for women writers includes Newbery winners.
Free Online Novels: These novels are fully online and range from romance to religious fiction to historical fiction.
ManyBooks.net: Download mysteries and other books for your iPhone or eBook reader here.
Authorama: Books here are pulled from Google Books and more. You’ll find history books, novels and more.
Prize-winning books online: Use this directory to connect to full-text copies of Newbery winners, Nobel Prize winners and Pulitzer winners.

wewantbalance:

Free books: 100 legal sites to download literature

The Classics

Browse works by Mark Twain, Joseph Conrad and other famous authors here.

  1. Classic Bookshelf: This site has put classic novels online, from Charles Dickens to Charlotte Bronte.
  2. The Online Books Page: The University of Pennsylvania hosts this book search and database.
  3. Project Gutenberg: This famous site has over 27,000 free books online.
  4. Page by Page Books: Find books by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and H.G. Wells, as well as speeches from George W. Bush on this site.
  5. Classic Book Library: Genres here include historical fiction, history, science fiction, mystery, romance and children’s literature, but they’re all classics.
  6. Classic Reader: Here you can read Shakespeare, young adult fiction and more.
  7. Read Print: From George Orwell to Alexandre Dumas to George Eliot to Charles Darwin, this online library is stocked with the best classics.
  8. Planet eBook: Download free classic literature titles here, from Dostoevsky to D.H. Lawrence to Joseph Conrad.
  9. The Spectator Project: Montclair State University’s project features full-text, online versions of The Spectator and The Tatler.
  10. Bibliomania: This site has more than 2,000 classic texts, plus study guides and reference books.
  11. Online Library of Literature: Find full and unabridged texts of classic literature, including the Bronte sisters, Mark Twain and more.
  12. Bartleby: Bartleby has much more than just the classics, but its collection of anthologies and other important novels made it famous.
  13. Fiction.us: Fiction.us has a huge selection of novels, including works by Lewis Carroll, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, Flaubert, George Eliot, F. Scott Fitzgerald and others.
  14. Free Classic Literature: Find British authors like Shakespeare and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, plus other authors like Jules Verne, Mark Twain, and more.

Textbooks

If you don’t absolutely need to pay for your textbooks, save yourself a few hundred dollars by reviewing these sites.

  1. Textbook Revolution: Find biology, business, engineering, mathematics and world history textbooks here.
  2. Wikibooks: From cookbooks to the computing department, find instructional and educational materials here.
  3. KnowThis Free Online Textbooks: Get directed to stats textbooks and more.
  4. Online Medical Textbooks: Find books about plastic surgery, anatomy and more here.
  5. Online Science and Math Textbooks: Access biochemistry, chemistry, aeronautics, medical manuals and other textbooks here.
  6. MIT Open Courseware Supplemental Resources: Find free videos, textbooks and more on the subjects of mechanical engineering, mathematics, chemistry and more.
  7. Flat World Knowledge: This innovative site has created an open college textbooks platform that will launch in January 2009.
  8. Free Business Textbooks: Find free books to go along with accounting, economics and other business classes.
  9. Light and Matter: Here you can access open source physics textbooks.
  10. eMedicine: This project from WebMD is continuously updated and has articles and references on surgery, pediatrics and more.

Math and Science

Turn to this list to find books about math, science, engineering and technology.

  1. FullBooks.com: This site has “thousands of full-text free books,” including a large amount of scientific essays and books.
  2. Free online textbooks, lecture notes, tutorials and videos on mathematics: NYU links to several free resources for math students.
  3. Online Mathematics Texts: Here you can find online textbooks likeElementary Linear Algebra and Complex Variables.
  4. Science and Engineering Books for free download: These books range in topics from nanotechnology to compressible flow.
  5. FreeScience.info: Find over 1800 math, engineering and science books here.
  6. Free Tech Books: Computer programmers and computer science enthusiasts can find helpful books here.

Children’s Books

Even children’s books are now available online. Find illustrated books, chapter books and more.

  1. byGosh: Find free illustrated children’s books and stories here.
  2. Munseys: Munseys has nearly 2,000 children’s titles, plus books about religion, biographies and more.
  3. International Children’s Digital Library: Find award-winning books and search by categories like age group, make believe books, true books or picture books.
  4. Lookybook: Access children’s picture books here.

Philosophy and Religion

For books about philosophy and religion, check out these websites.

  1. Bored.com: Bored.com has music ebooks, cooking ebooks, and over 150 philosophy titles and over 1,000 religion titles.
  2. Ideology.us: Here you’ll find works by Rene Descartes, Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, David Hume and others.
  3. Free Books on Yoga, Religion and Philosophy: Recent uploads to this site include Practical Lessons in Yoga and Philosophy of Dreams.
  4. The Sociology of Religion: Read this book by Max Weber, here.
  5. Religion eBooks: Read books about the Bible, Christian books, and more.

Plays

From Shakespeare to George Bernard Shaw to more contemporary playwrights, visit these sites.

  1. ReadBookOnline.net: Here you can read plays by Chekhov, Thomas Hardy, Ben Jonson, Shakespeare, Edgar Allan Poe and others.
  2. Plays: Read PygmalionUncle Vanya or The Playboy of the Western World here.
  3. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: MIT has made available all of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, and histories.
  4. Plays Online: This site catalogs “all the plays [they] know about that are available in full text versions online for free.”
  5. ProPlay: This site has children’s plays, comedies, dramas and musicals.

Modern Fiction, Fantasy and Romance

These websites boast collections of graphic novels, romance novels, fantasy books and more.

  1. Public Bookshelf: Find romance novels, mysteries and more.
  2. The Internet Book Database of Fiction: This forum features fantasy and graphic novels, anime, J.K. Rowling and more.
  3. Free Online Novels: Here you can find Christian novels, fantasy and graphic novels, adventure books, horror books and more.
  4. Foxglove: This British site has free novels, satire and short stories.
  5. Baen Free Library: Find books by Scott Gier, Keith Laumer and others.
  6. The Road to Romance: This website has books by Patricia Cornwell and other romance novelists.
  7. Get Free Ebooks: This site’s largest collection includes fiction books.
  8. John T. Cullen: Read short stories from John T. Cullen here.
  9. SF and Fantasy Books Online: Books here include Arabian Nights,Aesop’s Fables and more.
  10. Free Novels Online and Free Online Cyber-Books: This list contains mostly fantasy books.

Foreign Language

For books in a foreign language like French, Spanish and even Romanian, look here.

  1. Project Laurens Jz Coster: Find Dutch literature here.
  2. ATHENA Textes Francais: Search by author’s name, French books, or books written by other authors but translated into French.
  3. Liber Liber: Download Italian books here. Browse by author, title, or subject.
  4. Biblioteca romaneasca: Find Romanian books on this site.
  5. Bibliolteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes: Look up authors to find a catalog of their available works on this Spanish site.
  6. KEIMENA: This page is entirely in Greek, but if you’re looking for modern Greek literature, this is the place to access books online.
  7. Proyecto Cervantes: Texas A&M’s Proyecto Cervantes has cataloged Cervantes’ work online.
  8. Corpus Scriptorum Latinorum: Access many Latin texts here.
  9. Project Runeberg: Find Scandinavian literature online here.
  10. Italian Women Writers: This site provides information about Italian women authors and features full-text titles too.
  11. Biblioteca Valenciana: Register to use this database of Catalan and Valencian books.
  12. Ketab Farsi: Access literature and publications in Farsi from this site.
  13. Afghanistan Digital Library: Powered by NYU, the Afghanistan Digital Library has works published between 1870 and 1930.
  14. CELT: CELT stands for “the Corpus of Electronic Texts” features important historical literature and documents.
  15. Projekt Gutenberg-DE: This easy-to-use database of German language texts lets you search by genres and author.

History and Culture

Refresh your memory of world history, the classics and U.S. history here.

  1. LibriVox: LibriVox has a good selection of historical fiction.
  2. The Perseus Project: Tufts’ Perseus Digital Library features titles from Ancient Rome and Greece, published in English and original languages.
  3. Access Genealogy: Find literature about Native American history, the Scotch-Irish immigration in the 19th and 20th centuries, and more.
  4. Free History Books: This collection features U.S. history books, including works by Paul Jennings, Sarah Morgan Dawson, Josiah Quincy and others.
  5. Most Popular History Books: Free titles include Seven Days and Seven Nights by Alexander Szegedy and Autobiography of a Female Slave by Martha G. Browne.

Rare Books

Look for rare books online here.

  1. Questia: Questia has 5,000 books available for free, including rare books and classics.
  2. JR’s Rare Books and Commentary: Check this site for PDF versions of some rare books.

Arts and Entertainment

This list features books about celebrities, movies, fashion and more.

  1. Books-On-Line: This large collection includes movie scripts, newer works, cookbooks and more.
  2. Chest of Books: This site has a wide range of free books, including gardening and cooking books, home improvement books, craft and hobby books, art books and more.
  3. Free e-Books: Find titles related to beauty and fashion, games, health, drama and more.
  4. 2020ok: Categories here include art, graphic design, performing arts, ethnic and national, careers, business and a lot more.
  5. Free Art Books: Find artist books and art books in PDF format here.
  6. Free Web design books: OnlineComputerBooks.com directs you to free web design books.
  7. Free Music Books: Find sheet music, lyrics and books about music here.
  8. Free Fashion Books: Costume and fashion books are linked to the Google Books page.

Mystery

Here you can find mystery books from Sherlock Holmes to more contemporary authors.

  1. MysteryNet: Read free short mystery stories on this site.
  2. TopMystery.com: Read books by Edgar Allan Poe, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, GK Chesterton and other mystery writers here.
  3. Mystery Books: Read books by Sue Grafton and others.

Poetry

These poetry sites have works by Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allan Poe and others.

  1. The Literature Network: This site features forums, a copy of The King James Bible, and over 3,000 short stories and poems.
  2. Poetry: This list includes “The Raven,” “O Captain! My Captain!” and “The Ballad of Bonnie and Clyde.”
  3. Poem Hunter: Find free poems, lyrics and quotations on this site.
  4. Famous Poetry Online: Read limericks, love poetry, and poems by Robert Browning, Emily Dickinson, John Donne, Lord Byron and others.
  5. Google Poetry: Google Books has a large selection of poetry, fromThe Canterbury Tales to Beowulf to Walt Whitman.
  6. QuotesandPoem.com: Read poems by Maya Angelou, William Blake, Sylvia Plath and more.
  7. CompleteClassics.com: Rudyard Kipling, Allen Ginsberg and Alfred Lord Tennyson are all featured here.
  8. PinkPoem.com: On this site, you can download free poetry ebooks.

Miscellaneous

For even more free book sites, check out this list.

  1. Banned Books: Here you can follow links of banned books to their full text online.
  2. World eBook Library: This monstrous collection includes classics, encyclopedias, children’s books and a lot more.
  3. DailyLit: DailyLit has everything from Moby Dick to the more recent phenomenon, Skinny Bitch.
  4. A Celebration of Women Writers: The University of Pennsylvania’s page for women writers includes Newbery winners.
  5. Free Online Novels: These novels are fully online and range from romance to religious fiction to historical fiction.
  6. ManyBooks.net: Download mysteries and other books for your iPhone or eBook reader here.
  7. Authorama: Books here are pulled from Google Books and more. You’ll find history books, novels and more.
  8. Prize-winning books online: Use this directory to connect to full-text copies of Newbery winners, Nobel Prize winners and Pulitzer winners.

(via francesca-wayland)

kialna:

Something I have been working on today…

kialna:

Something I have been working on today…

(via francesca-wayland)

Six random facts about me


I was tagged by the delightful francesca-wayland and I’m still useless at tagging other people on tumblr, but here we go:

1. I’m left-handed, very much so, and very conscious of how much of the world is constructed for the right-handed majority. I’ve learned to do a number of things right-handed (including writing when a severe left shoulder injury put my arm in a sling for 6 weeks - twice: my right-handed scrawl is legible but slow) though there are really only two things I do properly right-handed. One is knitting - because I was taught by a right-hander & copied her - and the other is batting (indeed any sport that involves that kind of movement, including golf, hockey etc).

2. I’m bilingual. Both my parents are and they raised me that way. Although I sometimes resented being made to speak a language other than English as a child, as an adult I’m hugely grateful and have in fact made a career out of it.

3. Related to 2: travelling is one of my driving passions and I’ve been lucky enough to live in several different countries over the years - the UK, Australia, France, and the US. Currently living in London which I think is my favourite place so far. But every country and city has its advantages and disadvantages. There’s a sense in which I feel I belong anywhere - and nowhere.

4. I’ve published a book (an academic one) and quite a few other bits and pieces. I love to do research if I can a) choose my own topic and b) publish it when I think it’s ready and not when some manager thinks I should.

5. A year or so ago I quit my job after working full-time for 20 years in order to devote more time to creative pursuits. So far this seems to be the best decision I ever made.

6. I have a lot of books. A LOT of books. My shipping container has just arrived, and in it are over 150 boxes of books (as well as other stuff). London flats aren’t large so I have no idea where I’m going to put them all!

francesca-wayland:


This is not a photograph of lovers, this is a 400 year old marble statue of Pluto and Proserpina

Bernini was only 23 years old when he completed this.

francesca-wayland:

This is not a photograph of lovers, this is a 400 year old marble statue of Pluto and Proserpina

Bernini was only 23 years old when he completed this.

(Source: bottlerockt)

fyantagonist:

Benedict Cumberbatch helps Madame Tussauds artists out with the early sculpting for his new wax figure[HQ]

(via deareje)

bakerstreetbabes:

Always reblog napkin!lock.

(Source: tomhazeldine, via cumberfoil)

Sherlock Holmes: The BFI and the Museum of London Want You To Help Solve the Mystery of the Missing Holmes Film #FindSherlock


francesca-wayland:

The British Film Institute and the Museum of London are partnering to help solve a 100 year old mystery. The first film version of Sherlock Holmes was made in 1914 but has since been lost to time.

From their release:

The BFI and the Museum of London have teamed up to enlist the public’s help in finding a long lost cinematic treasure.

The 1914 silent film adaptation of the Sherlock Holmes story, A Study in Scarlet, directed by the London-born George Pearson and starring James Bragington, is the first British feature-length film based on the consulting detective. It was shot in summer 1914 in west London, at the Worton Hall studios in Isleworth. There were also scenes filmed on location at Cheddar Gorge in Somerset and Southport Sands in Merseyside, which stood in for the Rocky Mountains and the Utah plains, where much of Conan Doyle’s novella is set.

Unfortunately, due to a number of possible reasons, the film is missing, presumed lost. For this particular film, it is not known to have been seen much after initial release, and prints of the film may have suffered the fate of many others of the period – sacrificed for the war effort for the precious metals they contained.

As the museum prepares for the largest temporary exhibition on the super sleuth for over sixty years, which opens on 17 October, the BFI and the Museum of London are launching a call-out to “detectives” across the globe that can help us discover a copy of this lost film, exactly 100 years after it was made.

If members of the public know where it is, or have information which you think might help, we are asking them to emailSherlock.holmes@bfi.org.uk or spread the word on social media using #FindSherlock. We’ve also written a blog about it here.

So, do you know where this film is?

Let’s hope the wonders of crowdsourcing can find it. Perhaps the folks who are so good at finding lost Doctor Who episodes can have a look!

(Source: cumberfoil)

professorfangirl:

diannesylvan:

relatableteenblogger:

in case you were having a bad day, here’s a picture of Yo-Yo Ma, the famous cellist, on the floor of a bathroom with a wombat

I don’t even know what to make of this picture, but it made me honk like a demented goose, so mission accomplished.  Heeheehee.

Always reblog Yo-Yo and his wombat.

professorfangirl:

diannesylvan:

relatableteenblogger:

in case you were having a bad day, here’s a picture of Yo-Yo Ma, the famous cellist, on the floor of a bathroom with a wombat

I don’t even know what to make of this picture, but it made me honk like a demented goose, so mission accomplished.  Heeheehee.

Always reblog Yo-Yo and his wombat.

medievalpoc:

mediumaevum:

Medieval Hair Care
So that hair might grow wherever you wish. Take barley bread with the crust, and grind it with salt and bear fat. But first burn the barley bread. With this mixture anoint the place and the hair will grow.
Cook down dregs of white wine with honey to the consistency of a cerotum and anoint the hair, if you wish it to be golden. 
If the woman wishes to have long and black hair, take a green lizard and, having removed its head and tail , cook it in common oil. Anoint the head with this oil. It makes the hair long and black.
If, needed, you wish to have hair soft and smooth and fine, wash it often with hot water in which there is powder of natron [Native hydrous sodium carbonate] and vetch.
Take some dried roses, clove, nutmeg, watercress and galangal. Let all these, powdered, be mixed with rose water. With this water let her sprinkle her hair and comb it with a comb dipped in this same water so that [her hair] will smell better. And let her make furrows in her hair and sprinkle on the above-mentioned powder, and it will smell marvelously.
("De Ornatu Mulierum /On Women’s Cosmetics." in The Trotula : A Medieval Compendium of Women’s Medicine (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 2001))
image: Lorenzo Costa, Portrait of a Woman

Fun fact-some of these do work. And, they can work for Medieval POC, too! Just keep in mind that “Natural” isn’t always “Better”; the risk of allergic reactions and irritations is going to be there with pretty much any treatment or cosmetic made from plants or animals.
The “dregs of white wine” is probably dilute vinegar, which will lighten your hair, and the honey will moisturize it. This is fairly safe and beneficial for all hair types including Black hair, and can gently add highlights. Don’t, however, use undiluted vinegar on your hair or scalp.

[source]
The powder of natron is a powerful water softener, also called “washing soda” and “soda ash”. This makes water clean the hair more effectively, which in turn will make it softer. If the “vetch” referred to is milk vetch, the root is still used sometimes topically to increase blood flow to the area, which can theoretically increase hair growth. Although using soda ash in higher concentrations can significantly damage your hair, in controlled applications, it also loosens curls. It’s even used marketed as “Natural Hair Relaxer” for Black hair, under brand names like “Natralaxer”. In more dilute mixtures, it’s very good clarifier for any texture of oily hair, especially if your hair is very thick or coarse.

[source]
The dressing for hair growth with bear fat is an almost universally used recipe all over the world. Bear tallow pomade has been used by Indigenous Americans, Ancient China, Medieval Europe…pretty much everywhere. You can actually still buy it for that purpose. I think that the barley bread ash (charcoal, basically) was probably used for color and shine; a lot of different people mixed pigments into bear grease to add color and shine to their hair.This dressing used on long Black hair would have created a style much like this one:

[source]
Rather than bear fat, I find coconut oil to be an improvement. I often use it for braided styles myself, and I think that adding a bit of pigment or color to it would be a fun experiment.

[source]
Speaking of coloring hair…I have no clue whatsoever whether lizard frying oil would make a difference in hair color, but there’s honestly no reason to suppose that some kind of chemical produced by its skin couldn’t have caused a change in color…dyes and pigments can come from unlikely sources. Remember when everyone was freaking out because Starbucks used a coloring made from crushed beetles to color some of its drinks? All sorts of items have been used by all genders throughout history to add that extra special something to their hairstyles.

[source]
The hair perfume would certainly have smelled lovely, but a lot of the ingredients, like the clove, nutmeg, and galangal are not native to Europe and would have been imported from Southeast Asia and quite expensive. The ingredients as well as the recipes would have traveled from those areas. Galangal especially has beneficial topical uses similar to ginger, or tea tree oil. It’s mildly antimicrobial, so if there’s anything like fungus or dandruff clogging up your follicles, it can remove impediments to hair growth. Nutmeg oil can also mildly lighten hair a little. And all of them will result in a tingly, “spicy” scalp, and can cause burning if you have sensitive skin.

[source]
A last note-these cosmetic recipes come from a book known as “The Trotula”, which was created by Trotula of Salerno, who revolutionized Medieval medicine by and for women, synthesizing knowledge flowing out of Asia and the Middle East regarding medicine and specifically gynecology. In Medieval Europe, some of the most well-known people of color were physicians, because African and Asian medicine was well-known and revered.

Wikipedia page for Trotula

medievalpoc:

mediumaevum:

Medieval Hair Care

  • So that hair might grow wherever you wish. Take barley bread with the crust, and grind it with salt and bear fat. But first burn the barley bread. With this mixture anoint the place and the hair will grow.
  • Cook down dregs of white wine with honey to the consistency of a cerotum and anoint the hair, if you wish it to be golden
  • If the woman wishes to have long and black hair, take a green lizard and, having removed its head and tail , cook it in common oil. Anoint the head with this oil. It makes the hair long and black.
  • If, needed, you wish to have hair soft and smooth and fine, wash it often with hot water in which there is powder of natron [Native hydrous sodium carbonate] and vetch.
  • Take some dried roses, clove, nutmeg, watercress and galangal. Let all these, powdered, be mixed with rose water. With this water let her sprinkle her hair and comb it with a comb dipped in this same water so that [her hair] will smell better. And let her make furrows in her hair and sprinkle on the above-mentioned powder, and it will smell marvelously.

("De Ornatu Mulierum /On Women’s Cosmetics." in The Trotula : A Medieval Compendium of Women’s Medicine (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 2001))

image: Lorenzo Costa, Portrait of a Woman

Fun fact-some of these do work. And, they can work for Medieval POC, too! Just keep in mind that “Natural” isn’t always “Better”; the risk of allergic reactions and irritations is going to be there with pretty much any treatment or cosmetic made from plants or animals.

The “dregs of white wine” is probably dilute vinegar, which will lighten your hair, and the honey will moisturize it. This is fairly safe and beneficial for all hair types including Black hair, and can gently add highlights. Don’t, however, use undiluted vinegar on your hair or scalp.

image

[source]

The powder of natron is a powerful water softener, also called “washing soda” and “soda ash”. This makes water clean the hair more effectively, which in turn will make it softer. If the “vetch” referred to is milk vetch, the root is still used sometimes topically to increase blood flow to the area, which can theoretically increase hair growth. Although using soda ash in higher concentrations can significantly damage your hair, in controlled applications, it also loosens curls. It’s even used marketed as “Natural Hair Relaxer” for Black hair, under brand names like “Natralaxer”. In more dilute mixtures, it’s very good clarifier for any texture of oily hair, especially if your hair is very thick or coarse.

image

[source]

The dressing for hair growth with bear fat is an almost universally used recipe all over the world. Bear tallow pomade has been used by Indigenous Americans, Ancient China, Medieval Europe…pretty much everywhere. You can actually still buy it for that purpose. I think that the barley bread ash (charcoal, basically) was probably used for color and shine; a lot of different people mixed pigments into bear grease to add color and shine to their hair.This dressing used on long Black hair would have created a style much like this one:

image

[source]

Rather than bear fat, I find coconut oil to be an improvement. I often use it for braided styles myself, and I think that adding a bit of pigment or color to it would be a fun experiment.

image

[source]

Speaking of coloring hair…I have no clue whatsoever whether lizard frying oil would make a difference in hair color, but there’s honestly no reason to suppose that some kind of chemical produced by its skin couldn’t have caused a change in color…dyes and pigments can come from unlikely sources. Remember when everyone was freaking out because Starbucks used a coloring made from crushed beetles to color some of its drinks? All sorts of items have been used by all genders throughout history to add that extra special something to their hairstyles.

image

[source]

The hair perfume would certainly have smelled lovely, but a lot of the ingredients, like the clove, nutmeg, and galangal are not native to Europe and would have been imported from Southeast Asia and quite expensive. The ingredients as well as the recipes would have traveled from those areas. Galangal especially has beneficial topical uses similar to ginger, or tea tree oil. It’s mildly antimicrobial, so if there’s anything like fungus or dandruff clogging up your follicles, it can remove impediments to hair growth. Nutmeg oil can also mildly lighten hair a little. And all of them will result in a tingly, “spicy” scalp, and can cause burning if you have sensitive skin.

image

[source]

A last note-these cosmetic recipes come from a book known as “The Trotula”, which was created by Trotula of Salerno, who revolutionized Medieval medicine by and for women, synthesizing knowledge flowing out of Asia and the Middle East regarding medicine and specifically gynecology. In Medieval Europe, some of the most well-known people of color were physicians, because African and Asian medicine was well-known and revered.

image

Wikipedia page for Trotula

(Source: gallowglass.org)