The Case for Benedict Cumberbatch as the Greatest Holmes


thecutteralicia:


Since I came to Sherlock relatively late (second series) and immediately got so involved in fandom and the hysteria over Reichenbach, I’m only now getting around to reading the actual press reviews that have been published about the show. 

Inspired by the fact that Sherlock is the second most critically acclaimed drama series (behind Breaking Bad) according to Metacritic, I thought I’d share some of the more interesting or well-written reviews about Sherlock that I come across. (I’ll tag them “critics choice.”)

First up is from Indiewire:

The Case for Benedict Cumberbatch as the Greatest On-Screen Sherlock Holmes

Who is the greatest on-screen incarnation of Sherlock Holmes? It’s a complicated question — acting can be difficult enough to quantify even without the challenge of taking on the most frequently portrayed fictional character in the history of film and television. Each Holmes has had to compete with and be compared to the ones before him, going back to the anonymous actor who starred in the first Holmes film in 1900, a silent 30-second short from Arthur Marvin.

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I asked myself what style we women could have adopted that would have been unmarked, like the men’s. The answer was none. There is no unmarked woman.

There is no woman’s hair style that can be called standard, that says nothing about her. The range of women’s hair styles is staggering, but a woman whose hair has no particular style is perceived as not caring about how she looks, which can disqualify her for many positions, and will subtly diminish her as a person in the eyes of some.

Women must choose between attractive shoes and comfortable shoes. When our group made an unexpected trek, the woman who wore flat, laced shoes arrived first. Last to arrive was the woman in spike heels, shoes in hand and a handful of men around her.

If a woman’s clothing is tight or revealing (in other words, sexy), it sends a message — an intended one of wanting to be attractive, but also a possibly unintended one of availability. If her clothes are not sexy, that too sends a message, lent meaning by the knowledge that they could have been. There are thousands of cosmetic products from which women can choose and myriad ways of applying them. Yet no makeup at all is anything but unmarked. Some men see it as a hostile refusal to please them.

Women can’t even fill out a form without telling stories about themselves. Most forms give four titles to choose from. “Mr.” carries no meaning other than that the respondent is male. But a woman who checks “Mrs.” or “Miss” communicates not only whether she has been married but also whether she has conservative tastes in forms of address — and probably other conservative values as well. Checking “Ms.” declines to let on about marriage (checking “Mr.” declines nothing since nothing was asked), but it also marks her as either liberated or rebellious, depending on the observer’s attitudes and assumptions.

I sometimes try to duck these variously marked choices by giving my title as “Dr.” — and in so doing risk marking myself as either uppity (hence sarcastic responses like “Excuse me!”) or an overachiever (hence reactions of congratulatory surprise like “Good for you!”).

All married women’s surnames are marked. If a woman takes her husband’s name, she announces to the world that she is married and has traditional values. To some it will indicate that she is less herself, more identified by her husband’s identity. If she does not take her husband’s name, this too is marked, seen as worthy of comment: she has done something; she has “kept her own name.” A man is never said to have “kept his own name” because it never occurs to anyone that he might have given it up. For him using his own name is unmarked.

A married woman who wants to have her cake and eat it too may use her surname plus his, with or without a hyphen. But this too announces her marital status and often results in a tongue-tying string. In a list (Harvey O’Donovan, Jonathan Feldman, Stephanie Woodbury McGillicutty), the woman’s multiple name stands out. It is marked.


spookytectives:

thescienceofobsession:

cumbercrieff:

cluedo:

I went to the thrift store today and

what the actual fuck

Holy Jesus

ok but let’s not lose track of the real gem here

spookytectives:

thescienceofobsession:

cumbercrieff:

cluedo:

I went to the thrift store today and

what the actual fuck

Holy Jesus

ok but let’s not lose track of the real gem here

image

image

(via naturalshocks)

sherlockingmyhouse:

28 year olds can do this too! Right? RIGHT??? ;D

sherlockingmyhouse:

28 year olds can do this too! Right? RIGHT??? ;D

(via naturalshocks)

imtooticky:

One More Miracle

imtooticky:

One More Miracle

pardonmewhileipanic:

red3blog:

pardonmewhileipanic:

notcuddles:

nesft:

Crow: CROW YES!

It’s actually impossible to measure how many fucks a corvid give because there is no device sensitive enough to register such a tiny amount.

science/animal side of tumblr… explain to me the birb thing

Tail Pulling is a behavior noted in many corvids. The practical application is to create a distraction that will allow the birb to make off with the target’s food. Imagine being in the lunch room and a large fellow has a Twinkie you covet. You can’t just take it from him because he’ll defend his Twinkie. But if you thwap him on the back of his neck and then dash around to snag the Twinkie while he investigates, you stand a decent chance of enjoying spongey goodness. This is basically that in birb form.

Except corvids don’t only do this as a distraction. Sometimes they seem to just being doing it to mess with other animals/birbs. But to use my lunch room analogy, there are times you might thwap someone sneakily on the back of the neck just for amusement. Primates exhibit behavior that appears to be just be annoying other animals for amusement. Given how intelligent crows are, its not unlikely that this is a manifestation of an innate desire to just fuck with someone else for the fun of it. Such as this from the link above:

THANK YOU FOR THE BIRB KNOWLEDGE

(Source: yinqors, via xanthewalter)

Celebrity Fandom, Social Media, and a Changing World


acafanmomarchive:

(AKA: a post off the top of my head, and I still have a cold, so forgive any incoherence)

Celebrity fandom hasn’t changed changed much in the past century or so. We’re attracted (when we’re attracted) by that tantalizing tension between performance and reality - the role…

http://221beemine.tumblr.com/post/100328205168/ghostbees-bbc-radio-4x-is-having-a-lot-of


ghostbees:

BBC Radio 4x is having a lot of not-often-broadcast Holmes at the moment, which is a good occasion for any of you who might want to dip your toes in the sea of wonders that is radio drama but never really know where to start! The good thing about beeb radio is that: a. you can…

atharple:

this.

(Source: himse1992, via cumberfoil)